Going Global!

The Lord has been faithful! Trying to reconstruct this site and personalize it, all post from here henceforth will keep you posted on SirVic’s activities. God bless you as you keep supporting the gospel and may His light shine upon your path in Jesus name. May He be a billion God to you and my you never cease to say to Him #AMANAM! Download my singles from http://www.gospelph.com/sirvic, let’s relate on my twitter handle @sirvic_inchrist, talk to me on http://www.facebook.com/officialsirvic. One way or another just reach me, God bless you!

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SIRVIC: THE ALL NEW GOSPEL SENSATION

SirVic

SirVic

@sirvic_inchrist

@sirvic_inchrist

Praise the Lord! The grace of the Lord has been sufficient and now SirVic drops his singles Billion God & Amanam featuring @afydouglas. After some years of motivational rapping (Rythm And Peotry), the merciful Lord called SirVic a native of Essene in Ikot-Abasi Local Government Area of Akwa Ibom State into singing the Gospel.
He commenced music production officially in 2014 with the production of his album, in one of his singles he features @afydouglas a well established gospel singer. Twitter: @sirvic_inchrist, facebook: Victor Ekpo, BBM: 27bf2aba.

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K.O Baba Comedy Fellowship

One of Port Harcourt’s finest gospel Comedian/compere will be setting the pace again come August, bringing you the best of entertainment and showmanship the K.O Baba Comedy Fellowship brand is set to stir up the city of Port Harcourt again. Get set!

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Irony as Vin Diesel visits the Paul Walker’s family.

Los Angeles – Vin Diesel raced to the home of Paul Walker’s mother after learning about his death.
The 46-year-old actor has revealed he instinctively turned to Cheryl Walker for support and jumped on plane to California to be by her side as soon as he heard that ‘ The Fast and the Furious’ co-star had died in a fiery car accident last Saturday.
In a heart-breaking post on his Facebook page on Friday, Vin wrote: “When I heard, I immediately flew back to California, and went directly from the plane to his mother’s house…
“I thought they needed my strength, but realized when I got there and broke down before his family, that it was I who needed theirs.
“His mother hugged me and said I am so sorry… I said sorry? You’re the mother who lost a son?… She said yes, but you lost your other half…”
Paul has left behind his 15-year-old daughter, Meadow, and his girlfriend of seven years Jasmine Pilchard-Gosnell, 23.
A coroner has concluded the deaths of both Paul and his business partner, Roger Rodas, who was driving, were an accident, but investigators are currently looking into the cause of the single-car smash up, with speed believed to have been a factor. 
The family and friends of the Hollywood star held a private memorial at the site of the crash in Santa Clarita, California, on Monday night, and a public memorial service is being planned for 15 December.

Jennifer Hudsson pushes bacl wedding date.

Los Angeles – Jennifer Hudson keeps pushing her wedding date back.
The Black Nativity star – who has four-year-old son David with fiance David Otunga – has a date in mind for the big day and despite it continually “rolling around” each year she’s not planning on “rushing into anything”. 
Jennifer told Essence magazine: “Yes, there was a date set, and that date has come around again every year. In fact, the date may keep rolling around … When I’m ready to be married, I will be married. It’s that simple. Everyone should just chill. Our relationship is very strong. We’re both huge family people, and I’m only going to get married once. So I’m not rushing into anything.”
Jennifer had to leave her family behind in 2011 when she travelled to South Africa to film Winnie Mandela – a biopic about the late Nelson Mandela’s wife – and although she found the separation difficult she was fully committed to telling the story of the controversial political figure.
She explained: “I was like, ‘Oh, my God, you want me to leave my baby and my man?’ But so much was done to suppress Winnie’s voice, to keep her quiet. Winnie’s story needed to be told.”
Jennifer was among numerous celebrities who paid tribute to Nelson following his death on Thursday.
She said: “The Mandela family is in my thoughts and prayers during this difficult time. Mr. Mandela fought for freedoms and equality that changed the face of South Africa and the world. We can all learn from his extraordinary journey.”

Sound of music actress fades away at 91

Los Angeles — Eleanor Parker, who was nominated for Academy Awards three times for her portrayals of strong-willed women and played a scheming baroness in The Sound of Music, has died at 91.

Family friend Richard Gale said Parker died Monday morning due to complications from pneumonia. “She passed away peacefully, surrounded by her children at a medical facility near her home in Palm Springs,” Gale added.

Parker was nominated for Oscars in 1950, 1951 and 1955, but then saw her career begin to wane in the early 1960s. Her last memorable role came in 1965’s The Sound of Music, in which she played the scheming baroness who loses Christopher Plummer to Julie Andrews.

She worked only infrequently after that, appearing in films and on such TV shows as Fantasy Island, Murder, She Wrote and The Love Boat. She also starred in the short-lived 1960s TV series Bracken’s World.

“I’m primarily a character actress,” she said in a 1988 interview, explaining why she never achieved the stardom of so many of her co-stars. “I’ve portrayed so many diverse individuals on the screen that my own personality never emerged.”

Like William Holden, Robert Preston, Dustin Hoffman and others, Parker was discovered at the Pasadena Playhouse.

She was signed to a contract at Warner Bros., where she played only minor roles until the studio recognized her dramatic depth and cast her as Mildred Rogers in the 1946 remake of Of Human Bondage.

The Somerset Maugham story had made Bette Davis a star 12 years before. On Parker’s first day of filming, Davis sent her flowers and a note proclaiming, “I hope Mildred does as much for your career as she did for mine.”

A breakthrough performance

But the film flopped, and Parker was again relegated to mediocre roles until her breakthrough performance as an inmate in a brutal prison in the 1950 film Caged. The role brought Parker her first Oscar nomination, for best actress.

Her second came the following year as Kirk Douglas’s frustrated wife in Detective Story.

Her career fully blossomed with such follow-up films as Scaramouche with Stewart Granger, Above and Beyond with Robert Taylor, Escape from Fort Bravo with Holden, Valley of the Kings with Taylor, and The Naked Jungle with Charlton Heston.

She took on one of her most challenging roles in 1955 in Interrupted Melody, portraying opera star Marjorie Lawrence, who continued her career after contracting polio. Faced with having to lip-sync nine arias in three languages, she holed up in a Lake Arrowhead cabin for two weeks and played records eight to 10 hours a day.

Three Oscar nominations

The result: her third Oscar nomination.

Other notable films included The Man with the Golden Arm and A Hole in the Head (both opposite Frank Sinatra) and The King and Four Queens with Gable.

Growing up in Cedarsville, Ohio, Parker had yearned to be an actress, and when the family moved to Cleveland, she began taking acting lessons. In the summer she worked as an apprentice in a Martha’s Vineyard stock company, waiting tables to support herself.

After moving to Pasadena, she was cast in her first movie role at 19, a bit part in “They Died With Their Boots On,” starring Errol Flynn.

Parker’s first three marriages ended in divorce: to Navy dentist Fred L. Losse; producer Bert Friedlob, which resulted in three children, Susan, Sharon and Richard; and painter Paul Clemens, with whom she had a son, actor Paul Clemens. Her 1966 marriage to Shubert Theater manager Raymond Hirsch ended with his death in 2001.

FIFA ticket sales

Sao Paulo – FIFA said on Monday that football fans applied for more than 1.1 million tickets for the Soccer World Cup in Brazil in the first 24 hours after the latest sales phase opened.

The new sales window, which opened Sunday, is the first to be held after the tournament draw and schedule were announced last week. It will remain open until January 30.

If demand surpasses the number of entrances available for certain matches, a random selection draw will be held for fans who have requested tickets.

About 900 000 tickets were sold in the first stage of ticket sales earlier this year. Another 230 000 tickets were sold in the second phase in just seven hours.

Football’s governing body said a total of about 3.3 million tickets will be sold for the tournament.

Preparations for Madiba’s farewell!

Johannesburg – South Africa struggled on Monday to meet the unprecedented logistical challenge of hosting close to 100 world leaders flying in from every corner of the globe for the memorial service of freedom icon Nelson Mandela.

Mandela died at his Houghton home in Johannesburg last Thursday, aged 95.

“The world literally is coming to South Africa,” said the government’s head of public diplomacy, Clayson Monyela.

“I don’t think it has ever happened before,” Monyela said of the wave of 91 leaders, including US President Barack Obama, bearing down on the country.

Many will join the 80 000 people expected to cram into the FNB Stadium in Soweto on Tuesday to take part in a grand memorial service for their inspirational first black president.

Reflecting the depth and breadth of Mandela’s popularity, the event will see political foes Obama and Cuban President Raul Castro share the same stage in paying tribute to one of the towering political figures of the 20th century.

President Jacob Zuma will make the keynote address, and other speakers will include UN Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon and Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff.

Four of Mandela’s adored grandchildren will speak for his family, while neither his widow, Graça Machel, nor his ex-wife Winne Madikizela-Mandela are listed on the programme.

The memorial service, in the venue where Mandela made his last major public appearance for the 2010 World Cup final, is seen as a final chance for grieving South Africans to unite in a mass celebration of his life ahead of the more formal state funeral.

About 120 000 people will be able to watch the event on giant screens set up in three overflow stadiums in Johannesburg.

‘You are never prepared enough’

Although Mandela had been critically ill for months, the announcement of his death on Thursday night still rocked a country that had looked to his unassailable moral authority as a comforting constant in a time of uncertain social and economic change.

“I don’t think you are ever prepared enough,” said Zelda la Grange, who was Mandela’s long-time personal assistant both during and after his presidency.

“We had prepared ourselves emotionally, but still we are overcome by this feeling of loss and sadness,” La Grange said.

A single candle was lit in Mandela’s tiny prison cell on Robben Island, where he spent the harshest of his 27 years in apartheid jails.

The week-long observances will culminate on Sunday when Mandela will be buried at a family plot in his boyhood home of Qunu, in the Eastern Cape.

The government has sought to dissuade A-list dignitaries from attending, citing Qunu’s rural location, the lack of amenities and limited space.

Ahead of the burial, Mandela’s body will lie in state for three days from Wednesday in the amphitheatre of the Union Buildings in Pretoria, where he was sworn in as president in 1994.

Each morning, his coffin will be borne through the streets of the capital in a funeral cortege, to give as many people as possible the chance to pay their final respects.

11 000 troops mobilised

About 11 000 troops have been mobilised to ensure security and help with crowd control.

Despite the sudden influx of international dignitaries and the compressed preparation time, police spokesperson Solomon Makgale insisted that the security apparatus could cope.

“Having so many heads of state is not a security headache for us. We’ve learned over the years,” Makgale said, adding that they would be “working closely” with the foreign leaders’ own security details.

As well as Obama and three previous occupants of the White House, British Prime Minister David Cameron, French President Francois Hollande and Afghan President Hamid Karzai were all on the guest list.

UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon, who was among the first to arrive, visited the Nelson Mandela Foundation in Johannesburg where he paid handsome tribute to a “giant for justice” whose “mighty life” touched millions.

Parliament met in special session on Monday, with MPs carrying single red roses as they entered the assembly building that was flanked by giant portraits of Mandela in tribal dress and as an elder statesman.

Opposition leader Helen Zille said every politician had a duty to carry forward Mandela’s ideals of justice and equality for all.

“He has handed the baton to us and we dare not drop it,” Zille said.

Africa will be represented at the funeral by Nigeria’s Goodluck Jonathan and more than a dozen other heads of state and government.

Notable absentees include Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, who cited high travel and security costs, and Mandela’s fellow Nobel peace laureate, the Dalai Lama, who since 2009 has twice been denied a visa for South Africa.

Talk show queen Oprah Winfrey and singer-activist Bono, as well as British billionaire Richard Branson and musician Peter Gabriel were expected to be among the celebrity mourners.

Madiba! Making peace even in death.

As world leaders bury hatchets for the day and unite in paying respects to Nelson Mandela, the late South African leader may have a chance to promote peace, in death as he did in life.

Funerals of the great and the good, demanding attendance at short notice by busy and powerful leaders who rarely meet, have long been occasions for quiet diplomacy and Tuesday may be no exception – though not everyone will want to shake hands.

“It does cut through their scheduling so they can do things off the cuff,” said David Owen, who as British foreign secretary in the 1970s saw several historic figures interred. “Everybody is putting in bids,” he said of negotiations among diplomats for meetings on the sidelines of such global events.

US President Barack Obama may top many wish lists for a brief chat in Johannesburg, though it is unclear whom he will meet. Cuba’s Raul Castro, at daggers drawn with Washington for over half a century, will be there.

But the initially announced attendance of Iran’s new president Hassan Rouhani is in doubt – leaving a dramatic moment of US-Iran rapprochement unlikely.

If Obama is in demand, others are more used to cold shoulders – notably President Robert Mugabe of Zimbabwe, for whom such events offer a respite from international sanctions.

Aides to Prince Charles, representing Queen Elizabeth, will be determined to avoid a repeat of the funeral of Pope John Paul II in 2005, when the heir to the British throne had to blame “surprise” after he shook Mugabe’s hand at the service.

“There are all these people who want their photograph taken with somebody who doesn’t particularly want their photograph taken with them,” Owen said, recalling how, at the 1978 funeral of Kenyan independence leader Jomo Kenyatta, he physically prevented Uganda’s Idi Amin from shaking hands with the prince.

“He did try. And I did intercept it,” Owen told Reuters, saying British officials had been in an “absolute panic” about the Ugandan dictator seizing an unwelcome photo opportunities.

Even before the event, questions of attendance have been subject to anxious diplomatic calculus – to go, or not to go?

Obama, like Mandela the first black president of his country, leads a substantial delegation reflecting high regard for Mandela in the United States. But some online commentators have used that to renew criticism of his failure to attend the funeral of former British premier Margaret Thatcher in April.

When Egypt’s Hosni Mubarak visited Israel to mourn Yitzhak Rabin in 1995, some Israelis grumbled that peace would have been better served by him coming before Rabin was assassinated.

Jimmy Carter, among three former US presidents travelling with Obama to Mandela’s memorial, was accused by critics of undermining US influence in the Balkans after he sent his mother to represent him at the 1980 funeral of Yugoslavia’s Josip Broz Tito – a move Carter took to avoid meeting Soviet leader Leonid Brezhnev, who had just invaded Afghanistan.

When Brezhnev himself died two years later, it ushered in an extraordinary series of three Soviet state funerals in Red Square in as many years. Ronald Reagan, as US president, was moved to complain, according to biographers: “How am I supposed to get anyplace with the Russians if they keep dying on me?”

Those funerals, at the depth of the Cold War, offered vital clues to the new men following on, notably a first meeting in 1985 between Reagan’s vice president, George Bush, and Mikhail Gorbachev as the younger Russian prepared historic reforms.

But it was at the previous Kremlin funeral, of Yuri Andropov in 1984, that the diplomatic power of the mourner’s handshake was perhaps most memorably seen in public.

While David Owen, a physician by training, was offering his condolences to Andropov’s newly named successor, Konstantin Chernenko, he detected a wheeziness in the Soviet leader’s chest. He mentioned to a journalist Chernenko had emphysema – a potentially fatal lung condition common in cigarette smokers.

“It went round the world faster than I could believe,” Owen recalled. “The diagnosis was correct – and it was a slight warning, I suppose, to people that he wasn’t going to last that long.” Gorbachev oversaw Chernenko’s funeral 13 months later.